High School Course Descriptions

BIBLE

  • Hermeneutics and Spiritual Formation 

Bible I (1st semester) – The first half of this course will examine the basic structure of the Bible, with a strong emphasis on biblical hermeneutics. Students will have the ability to interpret different passages based upon authorship, date, historical context, literary context, and textual context. Students will understand foundational Bible study skills, including map skills, biblical languages, how-to-use commentaries and concordances, etc. The second half will provide students with a guide to spiritual formation. They will learn to pray biblically, study the Bible devotionally, fast with a purpose, evangelism, worship, service, silence, stewardship, journaling, and learning.

  • Attributes of God and World Missions/Evangelism

Bible I (2nd semester) – The first half of this course will analyze the numerous attributes of God, according to the biblical scriptures. Students will study these attributes of God: holiness, righteousness, immutability, supremacy, grace, mercy, wrath, contemplation, foreknowledge, etc. In order to progress to more spiritual depth and rigor, students must first understand the nature of God, the Supreme Being. The second half of the course will focus on missions. Students will understand the importance for global missions by seeing the spiritual desolation found within un-reached people groups. This will also include studying in depth the biblical call to missions and evangelism. Students will study heroes of the faith from the past who gave up all for the Gospel of Jesus. Students will be provided with resources for accomplishing the Great Commission.

  • Old Testament Survey I 

Bible II (1st semester) – In this course, students will study the general background of the Old Testament, including dates and geography. Students will study the Pentateuch (Genesis – Deuteronomy) and the History of Israel (Joshua – Esther). The content will mainly focus on authorship, date, theme, motifs, and notable expositions of key passages found within each book of study. Students will also have a basic understanding of noteworthy debates among biblical scholars over issues like the authorship of the Pentateuch, young or old Earth creationism, global or local flood, etc. Students will understand those debates because they will undoubtedly experience them on the collegiate level.

  • Old Testament Survey II

Bible II (2nd semester) – This course will continue the expository study of the Protestant Old Testament from the 1st semester of Bible II. Students will examine the Wisdom Literature (Job – Song of Solomon) and the Prophets (Isaiah – Malachi). Students will be able to identify different types of Psalms (thanksgiving, lament, community/individual, etc.) and gain spiritual nourishment from the Psalms. Students will study in the Prophets major themes, prophecies about Jesus, biblical characters, etc. Students will be able to see, in history, for the “setting of the stage” for the birth of the Messiah.

  • The Life of Jesus & the Early Church

Bible III (1st semester) – The Life of Jesus is an extensive study of the four Gospels. Attention is given to the unique contributions of each Gospel writer and the Sermon on the Mount. The life of the early church and specifically the life of Paul are studied from the Acts of the Apostles.

  • The New Testament Letters

Bible III (2nd semester) – All of the New Testament letters are studied in their historical context with emphasis given to practical application.

  • Apologetics & Comparative Religions

Historically, Philosophy of Religion has explored answers to three primary questions:

  1. Is there a God?
  2. If there is, what characterizes this God? Or what is God like?
  3. What is the meaning of life?

This course will consider the major responses to these questions from various perspectives of monotheism, polytheism, pantheism, deism, atheism, and agnosticism.

  • Developing a Christian Worldview

Worldviews are compared: naturalism, nihilism, existentialism, eastern monism, and postmodernism will be considered.
Reading: The Universe Next Door; A Basic Worldview Catalog by James Sire

Major world religions addressed include: Hinduism, Buddism, Confucianism, and Islam (Sunni, Shiite, & Wahhabism). Other smaller religious groups include Taoism, Shintoism, Judaism, Sikhism, Zoroastrianism, Jainism, and indigenous tribal practices.

COMPUTER SCIENCE

  • Computer Keyboarding Basics

Computer Keyboarding Basics is an introductory course designed for beginning students and those who desire to learn keyboarding for personal use. An introduction to the computer, computer keyboard skills, proofreading skills, and creation of business and letter formats are taught. After the students show proficiency in keyboarding skills and accuracy in timed writings, the proofreading skills and formatting skills will be introduced. (Prerequisite: None)

  • Computer Software Applications

Computer Software Applications is a course that provides students with computer skills that will make them marketable in the workplace and successful in utilizing their computer ability as a useful, valuable tool in furthering their education. The course teaches students computer software and applications software: Microsoft Office XP, which includes Microsoft Word, Microsoft PowerPoint, Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet, and Microsoft Access Database Manager. The students will interact with a variety of software packages working on activities, projects, and labs that will help prepare them for their futures. (Prerequisite: Demonstrated Keyboarding Proficiency)

 

ENGLISH

  • English as a Second Language – ESL

ESL provides instruction in the four communication skills; reading, writing, listening and speaking for non-native speakers of English whose proficiency is below what is needed for successful performance in a regular academic classroom. The three block courses cover topics such as Basic English grammar, vocabulary, idiomatic expressions, conversation and pronunciation, academic writing, and reading strategies. Language acquisition is related to the total community life of the academy, and interaction with native English speakers in daily life or on a school sponsored sport or academic team is strongly encouraged. Entry and exit levels for these classes are determined by a standardized assessment tool provided from the curriculum, NorthStar, by Longman publishing.

  • English I

Class Description: English I is an introductory course in literature that integrates reading, writing,

grammar, speaking, and study skills. There will be reading both in and out of class, writing exercises, grammar reviews, vocabulary study, prepared and informal discussions. By the end of the year, students should be able to read grade level literature independently, recognize themes in units and individual works, use context clues to learn new vocabulary, write narratives and essays that are grammatically correct and well formulated, and speak with confidence in various situations.

  • English I Honors

Class Description: The goal of this class will be to maintain a pace that will stimulate and challenge high-performing English students and will prepare them for success on college entrance exams. There will be extensive independent reading out of class as well as various major papers. By the end of the year, students should be able to interpret above grade level literature literally and symbolically, use context clues and inductive reasoning to learn challenging vocabulary, demonstrate creativity and originality in a variety of writing projects, and speak with confidence and persuasive ability in prepared narrations and informal discussions.

  • English II

English II is designed to reinforce the literary knowledge gained in English I and apply it to extended literary studies. This class will continue the transition from teacher-directed to independent work. Students will read independently but will be evaluated frequently to reinforce good time management. Students will also experiment with writing styles of all genres. In addition, students are led in basic interpretive discussion and studying Christian decision-making in today’s world. The literature is supplemented by a variety of writing assignments. In order to learn the necessary content of this course, students will participate in outside reading, journals, discussions, and research projects. Students should leave English II with the tools for thoughtful literary criticism and clarity in written communication. (Prerequisite: English I or English I Honors)

  • English II Honors

As in English I Honors, the goal of this class will be to maintain a pace that will stimulate and challenge high-performing English students and will prepare these students for success on college entrance exams. There will be extensive reading out of class. Writing will be taught in a workshop format and students will submit to both peer and teacher review. Each student will take an active role in reading from the text, reporting on supporting data to supplement the text, and engaging in critical evaluation and discussion. Grading will reflect initiative, critical thinking and creativity in written and verbal communication rather than the ability to memorize data for quizzes or worksheets. By the end of the year, students should be able to demonstrate verbally and in writing a basic overview of the history of British literature, read orally a variety of literature, including different forms of poetry, with clarity and expression, engage in literary analysis verbally and in writing, demonstrate excellence in all stages of the writing process, and speak with confidence and persuasive ability in defending an intellectual position while simultaneously respecting opposing points of view. (Prerequisite: English I Honors or permission of the instructor)

  • English III

English III surveys American Literature from the early works of the American Indians to the beginning of Modernism in the 20th century. Students will study America’s earliest historical documents in an effort to understand the relationship between history and literature. Students will complete a major research project in the first semester and a major creative writing piece in the second, in addition to short essays throughout the year. Writing assignments will emphasize clarity and thesis formation to prepare the class for English IV and college-level papers. Vocabulary, spelling, and grammar will be assessed through weekly vocabulary tests and grammar homework.

  • English III Honors/Advanced English

English III Honors, like English III, focuses on American Literature, but will reach further toward the present and cover a few works outside of the canon of American work. The focus is on reading, with regular homework and reading quizzes to maintain the pace necessary to cover several books. Students will complete a major research project in the first semester and a major creative writing piece in the second, in addition to short essays throughout the year. Writing assignments will emphasize clarity and thesis formation to prepare the class for English IV and college-level papers. Vocabulary, spelling, and grammar will be assessed through weekly vocabulary tests and grammar homework.

  • English IV

English IV is a college preparatory course designed to emulate both a [college] freshman-level composition section, as well as a specific genre-study class. Through this course, students will demonstrate knowledge of significant works of British literature from the Anglo-Saxon period to the present and make relevant comparisons. Along with these sections, students will participate in a variety of standardized test-taking preparations, vocabulary development exercises, and grammar lessons. Students will use literary selections as the basis for Christian decision-making discussions. The course requires the completion of two lengthy projects: the Senior Thesis, a lengthy work of analytical research, and the Senior Experience. In line with The King’s Academy’s initiative to encourage its students to further explore their own lives and the communities around them, the Senior Experience will be used to supplement the students’ classroom knowledge with a wide range of experiences which seek to move the learner from a passive absorber of knowledge to a scholar who explores his faith and knowledge proactively.

FINE ARTS

  • Art

The purpose of this course is to understand God’s purpose for art and its place in history, in society today and in the student’s life; and to develop skills through the study of the elements and principles of design that will enable a student to create works of art that express his or her thoughts, feelings, and experiences. (Prerequisite: None; open to all high school grade levels.)

  • Advanced Art I, II, III

The purpose of this course is to intensify the development of technical skills and understanding of art criticism to enable the students to assess their art and others’ based on an understanding of the organizational components and expressive qualities of the art work; and to develop a portfolio they will continue to add to as they mature in their work. (Prerequisite: Art)

  • Choir

Students will study and perform music of a diverse repertoire of vocal/choral music. Through varying levels of study, the student will be instructed in proper vocal technique, musicianship, theory and the cultural and historical context of choral literature. Music is a creation of God for the expression of human emotion as well as

the communication of spiritual truths through “psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs, and making melody in your heart to the Lord” (Ephesians 5:19). For this reason, part of the purpose of the choir will be to aid in the worship of God through several performances at churches, community groups, and school. (Prerequisite: Audition; open to all high school grade levels)

  • Orchestra

Students will study and perform music of a diverse repertoire of instrumental music. Through varying levels of study, the student will be instructed in theory, musicianship, proper technique, and cultural and historical content. Students have opportunities to perform at churches, community groups, and school. (Prerequisite: Audition; open to all high school grade levels)

 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES

  • Chinese I

This course is an introduction to the Chinese language and culture. Students will start with the Pinyin system and acquire oral language skills through a variety of activities. This course will focus on oral proficiency and students will learn to recognize, read and write at least 150 basic simplified Chinese characters in context. At the end of the school year, students will reach ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) Beginning- Mid Level of oral proficiency, which is equivalent to HSK Level 1, (Chinese Proficiency Test) and will acquire the basic communication skills: asking and answering questions, describing likes and dislikes; making short presentations in Chinese and engaging in short reading and writing activities. These skills will be employed within the topics such as family, friends, leisure activities, home and school. Chinese movies, songs and videos will be integrated into the course for the purpose of bringing students insights of Chinese family and school life.

  • Chinese II

This course is a continuation of Chinese I, focusing on building students’ command of oral communicative structures in more sophisticated contexts. In class, we will work on building oral fluency and their confidence in communicating with Chinese speakers. We will aim at conducting the class mostly in Chinese in second semester. Reading and grammar skills will be developed through reading. Students are expected to become more proficient in both handwritten as well as word-processed Chinese writing. Students will be able to recognize at least 300 basic Chinese characters, and reach the ACTFL beginning-high oral proficiency level (which is equivalent to HSK level 2) at the end of the course.

  • Greek II

Year two of this course continues the student’s study of Greek vocabulary, grammar, and translation. The format of Greek II is very similar to the first year, with weekly memory verses, daily lessons, and integrated reviews. At this level, students will continue to grow in the knowledge of the Greek language as they learn how to use two more noun cases, two verb conjugations, and various prepositions and pronouns. The work is slightly more challenging than in Greek I.  By the end of the year student will know about half of the word occurrences in the New Testament.

  • Spanish I  (two-semester course)

An introduction to the language and culture of the Spanish-speaking community. Emphasis is on listening and speaking skills, with the goal of incorporating basic grammar, verb structure, and survival vocabulary into actual communicative situations. Students should complete the course with an appreciation of the linguistic and cultural commonalities shared by Spanish and English, and an enhanced awareness of the growing opportunities for cultural exchange in their immediate environments. (Prerequisite: None; open to all high school grade levels)

  • Spanish II  (two-semester course)

With an increased emphasis on reading and writing, the course continues to build on the listening and speaking skills acquired in Spanish I. Communicative functions include relating knowledge, expressing feelings, making requests, and asking and answering questions in the target language in a variety of tenses. Topics for study include aspects of Mexican culture and history, as well as translation and application of Spanish Scripture. Integrating new vocabulary into more spontaneous and personal forms of expression is a course goal. (Prerequisite: Spanish I)

  • Spanish III (Available as Dual-Enrollment) (two-semester course)

Designed for students on a college-preparatory track seeking advanced placement, career advantages, and/or mission and relational opportunities. Topics in all four communication skills relate to culture, literature, current events, and personal experience. Content includes use of the subjunctive forms, idiomatic and figurative expressions, and an overview of the geography, culture, and history of Spain. Students are encouraged and given opportunities to develop their language skills with native speakers. (Prerequisites: Spanish I and Spanish II)

  • Spanish IV (Available as Dual-Enrollment) (two-semester course)

Advanced language course for students working toward fluency. In-class activities focus on native-speaker listening practice and application of vocabulary to” round-table” discussions. Course requirements for the year include the reading of a Spanish novel and weekly cultural listening assignments. Students continue in-depth study of the subjunctive mood, idiomatic language, and theme-specific vocabulary. In the final unit, students examine Don Quijote, the great literary work of Spain. (Prerequisites: Spanish I, II, and III)

 

MATHEMATICS

  • Algebra I

This course is a preparatory class for the rest of the students’ high school mathematics career. Students who take Algebra I as a freshman will be on track to take Bridge Math, Statistics/Probability or Pre-Calculus their senior year. Algebra I places an emphasis on the systematic development of the language through which most of mathematics is communicated. This course provides the mathematical understanding to operate with concepts at an abstract level, and then apply them in a process that fosters generalizations and insights beyond the original content. Topics covered are properties of the number system, linear functions, inequalities, operations on real numbers and polynomials, exponents, radicals, and quadratics. Successful completion of this course prepares students for Algebra II their sophomore year. (Prerequisite: None)

  • Honors Algebra I

This course is a preparatory class for the rest of the students’ high school mathematics classes and designed for students who wish to pursue careers in science, technology, or medicine. Students who take Honors Algebra I as a freshman and show great success will be recommended to take Honors Algebra II their sophomore year. Algebra I places an emphasis on the systematic development of the language through which most of mathematics is communicated. This course provides the mathematical understanding to operate with concepts at an abstract level, and then apply them in a process that fosters generalizations and insights beyond the original content. Topics covered are properties of the number system, linear functions, inequalities, operations on real numbers and polynomials, exponents, radicals, and quadratics. Topics found in standard algebra are covered with increased emphasis placed on problem solving, writing skills (especially in writing algebraic proofs), and algebraic applications. Students enrolled in this course have demonstrated a high degree of success and interest in mathematics. Because this is an honors course, it will include extended reading assignments as well as research writing based on content material. Projects will apply algebra to real-world situations. The pace of the course will be faster than College – Prep Algebra I. (Prerequisite: Pre-Algebra and/or teacher recommendation)

  • Algebra II

This course helps the students think logically using deductive reasoning, inspiring them to organize their ideas in other courses by using simple facts and logic to achieve positive results, and it also includes an understanding of the wide range of applications in other fields like astronomy, engineering, geology, biochemistry, and others. (Prerequisite: Algebra I)

  • Honors Algebra II

This course is a bridge between the concepts learned previously in the students’ Honors Algebra I class and more advanced mathematics such as Honors Geometry, Honors Pre-Calculus, and Calculus I and II.  Students who take Honors Algebra II and show great success will be recommended to take Honors Geometry or the next appropriate honors math course during the next school year.  Algebra II continues to place an emphasis on the systematic development of the language through which most of mathematics is communicated. This course also provides the mathematical understanding to operate with concepts at an abstract level, and then apply them in a process that fosters generalizations and insights beyond the original content with an emphasis on deductive reasoning skills to ready students for geometry.  Topics covered are Linear Relations and Functions, Systems of Equations and Inequalities, Matrices, Polynomials, Quadratic Functions and Inequalities, Polynomial Functions, Conic Sections, Rational Expressions and Equations, Exponential and Logarithmic Relations, Sequences and Series, and Statistics.  Topics found in regular algebra are covered with increased emphasis placed on problem solving, writing skills (especially in writing algebraic proofs), and algebraic applications.  Students enrolled in this course have demonstrated a high degree of success and interest in mathematics. Because this is an honors course, it will include extended reading assignments as well as research projects based on content material and projects related to the real world. The pace of the course will be faster than College Prep Algebra II. (Prerequisite: Honors Algebra I and/or teacher recommendation)

  • Intermediate Algebra II/A

This course is the first year of a two-year sequence, which will bridge the concepts learned previously in the students’ Algebra I class and higher-level mathematics such as Geometry, Bridge Math, and Statistics/ Probability.  Students who take Intermediate Algebra II/A this year will complete the course next year in Intermediate Algebra II/B where they will receive their Algebra II course credit. In order to stay on track with the Tennessee State Standards, students enrolled in Intermediate Algebra II/A will also complete their geometry course in the same year.  Algebra II continues to place an emphasis on the systematic development of the language through which most of mathematics is communicated. This course also provides the mathematical understanding to operate with concepts at an abstract level, and then apply them in a process that fosters generalizations and insights beyond the original content with an emphasis on deductive reasoning skills to ready students for geometry. Topics covered are: a review of Algebra I concepts to be successful in Algebra II, Solving equations and inequalities, Linear relations and functions, Solving Equations and Equalities, Linear Relations and Functions, Systems of Equations and Inequalities, Matrices, and Polynomials. (Prerequisite: Algebra I)

  • Intermediate Algebra II/B

This course is the completion of the Algebra II course that the students began in Intermediate Algebra II/A. They will receive their Algebra II course credit after successful completion of this course.  Algebra II/B continues to place an emphasis on the systematic development of the language through which most of mathematics is communicated. This course also provides the mathematical understanding to operate with concepts at an abstract level, and then apply them in a process that fosters generalizations and insights beyond the original content with an emphasis on deductive reasoning skills to ready students for Bridge Math or Statistics/Probability.  Students will take one or both of these courses their senior year. Topics covered are Radical Expressions, Rational Exponents, Radical Equations and Inequalities, Complex Numbers, Quadratic Functions and Inequalities, Rational Expressions and Equations, and Exponential and Logarithmic Relations. (Prerequisite: Intermediate Algebra II/A)

  • Tennessee Bridge Math

This course is a senior year high school math class for students who have successfully completed Algebra I, Algebra II, and Geometry. This course is designed to prepare students for a college algebra course. Tennessee Bridge Math places an emphasis on introducing concepts that the student has previously studied in a new approach. This class focuses on making connections between concepts and allows for a more in-depth understanding of the topics covered. Topics covered are:  Essential Mathematics, Essential Algebra and Statistics, Geometry and Reasoning, Measurement; Linear Systems of Equations, Transformations, Quadratic Functions, Advanced Functions and Relations and Trigonometry. (Prerequisite: Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry)

  • Geometry

This course helps the students think logically as they learn geometric principles. It also provides them with an understanding of the wide range of geometrical applications in other fields like astronomy, engineering, geology, biochemistry, and others. (Prerequisite: Algebra I)

  • Honors Geometry

This course helps the students think logically as they learn geometric principles. It guides them in connecting various concepts in algebra and geometry with each other. It also provides them with an understanding of the wide range of geometrical applications in other fields like astronomy, engineering, geology, biochemistry, and others. This course provides students an opportunity for greater knowledge of the history of mathematics. (Prerequisite: Algebra I)

  • Honors Precalculus

This course is designed for students planning to enroll in a college calculus course. It entails a study of elementary functions – polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, rational – their graphs, and applications.  (Prerequisite: Algebra II, Geometry)

  • Honors Calculus I (Available as Dual-Enrollment)

This course is a college preparatory course for students who anticipate pursuing a technical career such as science, engineering, computer science, architecture, mathematics, or medicine. Calculus is a course of higher mathematics that can be defined as a reformation of elementary mathematics using a limit process. It plays a great role in shaping our lives through wide applications in almost every aspect that has any technical necessity by the use of the maximum and minimum concepts in financing, space adventure, construction, science, medicine, statistics, and many others. (Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus with a minimum grade of B)

  • Statistics

Statistics is an advanced mathematics course that uses meaningful problems and appropriate technologies to use statistical concepts developed in previous courses to develop more advanced means of statistical analyses, interpretations, and predictions. (Prerequisite: Algebra II)

 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

  • Physical Education: Weight-Training

This course is designed for students who would like to know how weight training can help them achieve their goals and how to design a personal weight-training plan. The student begins by setting goals and designing a weight training plan specific to his own individual needs. During the year, the student follows the training

plan, and learns new techniques & lifts. In addition, the student will learn about eating habits and the potential long-term effects. (Prerequisite: Wellness; designed for juniors and seniors)

  • Physical Education: Individual Fitness

This course is designed for students who would like to live a healthy lifestyle. This Individual Fitness program will be tailored to specific needs and goals. The student will learn to shed fat, lose inches, and increase strength and stamina by exercising and making healthy choices. By the end of the course, he or she will have the knowledge to maintain that healthy lifestyle.  (Prerequisite: Wellness; designed for juniors and seniors)

  • Wellness

This course is designed to develop personal health practices that are conducive to sound mental, social as well as physical health. To assist in the physical development of the student, the teaching of strength and conditioning activities and individual sports skills will be an integral part of the course. Christian perspectives are presented as they pertain to competition, egoism, coed participation, and athleticism. (Prerequisite: None; open to all high school grade levels)

 

SCIENCE

  • Anatomy & Physiology

Anatomy & Physiology is a course to study God’s greatest creation, the human being. The course includes the structure, function, and disorders of all organs in the eleven-organ system, frequently used anatomical terms, and clinical applications of the body. Students will learn how their bodies are constructed and the responsibility of caring for their bodies as the dwelling place of the Holy Spirit. (Prerequisite: Biology)

  • Human Biology/Advanced Anatomy & Physiology (Available as Dual-Enrollment)

Introduction to the structure and function of the human body with emphasis on human health and welfare. This course is offered for dual enrollment through Carson-Newman College and serves as a general education credit. It will not fulfill general biology requirements for science majors in college. (Prerequisite: Biology I)

  • Biology I

Biology is a study of God’s creation. Students will learn to use the scientific method and inquiry to evaluate scientific theories as well as develop their own theories. Students will explore and critically analyze the scientific issues related to creation, intelligent design, and evolution. Cellular and molecular biology will be discussed with an emphasis on human heredity. The students will also survey the five kingdoms. (Prerequisite: None; open to all high school grade levels)

  • Honors Biology I

Biology is a study of God’s creation. Students will learn about the scientific process, cellular anatomy and reproduction, genetics, ecology, and will critically analyze the scientific issues related to creation, intelligent design, and evolution. Hands-on activities will emphasize the development of important skills such as detailed observation, accurate recording, experimental design, and data interpretation and analysis. Students will develop critical thinking skills through their own research and class discussions concerning issues that relate to current advancements in Biology. (Prerequisite: None; open to all high school grade levels)

  • Chemistry I

Chemistry I is the systematic study of matter and energy as they relate to chemical changes. Topics covered include the structure of matter, techniques used to denote chemical changes, organic and nuclear chemistry. Laboratory exercises and use of chemical reactions, and the study of acids, bases, salts, electro, thermo, organic, and nuclear chemistry. Laboratory exercises are used to illustrate the concepts explained and used in the classroom. (Prerequisite: Algebra I)

  • Honors Chemistry I 

Chemistry I is the systematic study of matter and energy as they relate to chemical changes. Topics covered include the structure of matter, techniques used to denote chemical changes, organic and nuclear chemistry. Laboratory exercises and use of chemical reactions, and the study of acids, bases, salts, electro, thermo, organic, and nuclear chemistry. Laboratory exercises are used to illustrate the concepts explained and used in the classroom. Students in Honors Chemistry I will explore chemistry topic of their choice in depth and share this new knowledge as a research project and presentation. (Prerequisite: Algebra I)

  • Conceptual Physics

Conceptual Physics is a laboratory science course that studies the relationships between matter and energy.  Students explore physics concepts through an inquiry-based approach along with appropriate algebra-based mathematics.  Topics in this course include mechanics, waves and optics, electricity and magnetism, and atom.  This course is designed for students who elect to take this course prior to taking biology and chemistry.

  • Honors Physics (Available as Dual-Enrollment)

Physics is the systematic study of the physical world using a small number of basic concepts, equations, and assumptions. Topics covered include motion and vectors, work and energy, momentum and collisions, statics and dynamics, fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, waves, optics, electricity, magnetism, atomic, nuclear, and

particle physics. Laboratory exercises are used to illustrate the concepts explained and used in the classroom. (Prerequisites: Algebra II with a minimum grade of B, geometry with a minimum grade of B, completed or enrolled in Pre-Calculus).

 

SOCIAL STUDIES

  • Personal Finance

Personal Finance is a required course that will teach students how to save money, negotiate deals, establish a budget, identify and understand different types of investments and achieve financial and career goals, describe the danger of debt, recognize the advantages of renting and owning a home, become an aware consumer, and understand the different types of insurance. Financial Peace by Dave Ramsey is the curriculum used for the class. (Prerequisite: None)

  • United States Government/Economics

This course is designed to study the creation of the United States as a political power, supplementing traditional fields of study and knowledge with a Christian overview:  the men who laid the foundation and the Biblical principles by which they lived.  The course in economics supplements text work with practical “real-world” units, such as “buying a car” and “real world costs.”  Daily current events discussions fall also within the framework of the class. (Prerequisite: None)

  • United States History

The historical parameters of this course examine the origins and settlements of the first people of the United States from around the 1700’s to the present. Textbook assignments will be supplemented with other texts, videos, worksheets and field trips.  Each assignment and experience in and out of class will provide for learning through knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis and evaluation from a Judeo-Christian worldview. (Prerequisite: None)

  • World Geography

The course in World Geography combines various elements of geography, including physical and regional.  Emphasis is placed on scripture and biblical philosophy.  Students will see the relationship between physical geography and economic features of countries and the way of life of the people.  Students will also gain a new approach for the wonders of God’s creation. (Prerequisite: None)